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Useful websites

ChildLine
Get help and advice about racism and what to do if someone is being abusive or nasty to you because of your race, the colour of your skin or your religion.


Show Racism The Red Card
Show Racism the Red Card - the campaign which uses top footballers to educate people against racism.


Kick It Out
Kick It Out - Let's Kick Racism Out of Football.


Advice for victims of crime
If you have been a victim of any crime or been affected by a crime committed against someone you know, help is available.

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Male teen in white hoodi, red scarf and jeans

Racial hate crime


Racism is treating someone differently or unfairly simply because they belong to a different race or culture.


If the police find out that a crime was motivated by racial hatred, they will treat the incident very seriously. Sentences for crimes with a racist motive will be more severe than for similar crimes without this motive.

What is racial hate crime?

A race crime isn’t just when someone becomes a victim because of the colour of their skin, it can also include nationality, culture and language.

Any racial hate crime reported to the police is treated seriously because of the fear racist crime can create within communities.
A man has been racially abused

Types of racist crime

Any crime committed against someone because of their race is classed as a 'racially aggravated' or 'racially motivated' offence. For example, someone could be threatened with violence or assaulted because of their race.

You don't have to be physically attacked or injured to be a victim of a race hate crime.

You could be subjected to abuse that you find offensive. It's also illegal for anyone to use threatening and abusive language or give out flyers or leaflets which could lead other people to commit a criminal act against someone because of their race.

If it's proven that the offender's main motivation was based on prejudice or their hatred of another race, the sentence can be more severe than for the same offence without a racial motivation.
A man talks to a Community Support Officer

Reporting a racial crime

If you've been the victim of a crime and think you were targeted because of your race, you should make this clear to the police officer when you're giving your statement.

You should also make sure the incident is reported to your local community safety unit.

Every police force in the country has one of these units and it's their job to monitor and record the number of hate crimes committed in your area. They work in the community to combat the problem.

You can report an incident by:

Telephoning 101 or

Reporting a crime online


Unfortunately racism can exist in all races and cultures. Racists feel threatened by anyone from a different race or culture.


It is illegal to treat people differently or unfairly because of their race and no one has the right to make you feel bad or abuse you.





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